Today’s Push/Pull Marketing Doesn’t Have to Be a Tug-o-War

Business men pulling ropeThe Internet has brought the term ‘savvy consumer’ to a whole new level, especially in the realm of product marketing.

 

Today’s B2B audiences are real-time researchers with the ability to quickly ascertain data on a product as well as a company to make very informed decisions based on:

 

-Comparative data (think side-by-side datasheets from you and your competitor)

-Community insight (such as online reviews and comments in user forums)

-Corporate support (when others within an organization back a decision)

 

Traditional B2B marketing has always employed a hybrid ‘Push/Pull’ strategy that integrates the needs and requirements of an end user with the objectives of a company.  But in today’s digital world, where fragmentation has split once-broad audiences into very niche communities, some marketers may be struggling with getting a firm grip on the rope.  Smart marketers will recognize that the larger change is in the overall messaging, with only tweaks needed to the tactics themselves.

 

The anchor position:  The web makes it easy to consume content, but can also make gathering information an overwhelming proposition.  To get it right, keep your message clear and focused on how you benefitting the user.

 
The muscle: Users now chose the environment in which they obtain information.  There is something to be said for strength in numbers, so make sure you deliver your message throughout multiple channels (analog & digital) to ensure you’re hitting your audience at the appropriate stage and within the correct medium.  A modern B2B marketing strategy not only uses the familiar tactics where audiences consume information—company website, trade publications, eblasts–but also areas where engagement and communities are growing, such as LinkedIn or Pinterest, which are currently building out some good marketing avenues.

 

Today’s Push/Pull marketing doesn’t need to keep the tension on the rope.  To fully integrate this B2B marketing strategy, alter your messaging to match what your audience is looking for—make it concise and informative.

 

Then, look at the different channels your audiences are using to obtain their information and start to bring your messaging to them through those channels.

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